Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference in a single reed and double reed?
A double reed call has two reeds and in turn produces a raspy sound by just putting straight air into a call. However a double reed is limited in range of sound to this one raspy sound. A call does not have to be a double reed to be raspy. It just has to be blown correctly. A single reed requires a little more voice to be put into the call to produce a ducky sound, but once this is accomplished, a single reed requires a lot less air to operate and is far more versatile in sound. And the more versatile the more effective.
 
Which call takes less air to blow?
The amount of air needed to blow a call is not necessarily determined by the call. It is determined by the reed and reed length. The longer the reed-the deeper the sound and the harder to blow. The shorter the reed-the higher pitch the sound and the easier to blow. All QuackHead calls can be made easier or harder to blow.
 
What is backpressure?
Backpressure is a built in resistance in a call’s airflow. Backpressure affects the call’s sound when air is put into a call with minimal effort. It helps control a call much easier, while trying to make several different sounds. However, if you try and put too much air too fast into one of these calls, the call will break or squeak relatively easy. A call with little to no backpressure has to be driven all the way, but you will be able to push this call faster and harder, while calling.
 
Do these calls blow wet?
Every call we meticulously craft is designed to blow wet and perform under the most extreme hunting conditions. This has been taken into account on every tone board we design, along with extensively testing, to make sure you get the highest quality call in the field. If for any reason you have any problems with the call please call us direct and not the retail location where you bought the call. We may have to make special adjustments to a call to fit you individually. Regardless we will fix your problem or replace it with a new one. We want you to have a call that you can use.
 
What call should I use in open water, fields, timber, etc.?
Instead of thinking of area specific calls, think of situation specific calls. Our calls are designed to be this way. Each of our calls are designed for different sound and volume specific situations, because some similar areas may require different volumes and sounds due to hunting pressure, weather, or time of year. So if you are looking for a call that’s quiet, loud, soft, whiney, deep, or raspy, or maybe all of the above then we have a call for you. You will find this makes much more sense and is much more effective than using”open water” call only in open water. Remember, the more versatile you are the more effective you will be.
 
How do I operate a duck call?
Holding the Call
Hold the call like you were in the Army saluting a superior. The end piece should be between your thumb and forefinger. Now slightly cup your hand to form the shape of the letter “C”. Remember not to cup your hand so much that you begin to muffle the sound.
 
Putting the call to your Mouth
While holding the call, place the barrel to your mouth like you were drinking from a soda bottle. Make sure your that your lips have a good seal around your lips, and without so much pressure that your lips are uncomfortable.

Key Words for Blowing a Duck Call
The Quack - Hut, Hoot, ooot, Quick, Quit, Doit, Dwit
The Feed Call - Too-ka, Tic-ka, Dig-ga, Doo-ga, Kit-ty, Get, ty
The Cluck - Cook, Shook

How To Blow A Canada Goose Call?
There are two ways to blow a goose call, clean, and with a little throat. Both will give the caller more goose sounds in the field.

Hand position is the first thing the caller must have in place to blow a call properly. Index finger and thumb are placed around the end of the insert, all other fingers are together and used as an extension of the call. Your off hand should be placed with finger tips just above your on hand finger nails. Your palms should be placed together.

The sound to blow into the call is Goo-it. This will make it honk. One thing most callers do is they blow to hard. A good rule is soft on the start and blow harder on the back. Blow the goo sound just hard enough to start the call, increase the air pressure to break the sound over and stop all air when your tongue hits the roof of you mouth.
Another mistake callers do is not putting enough air into a call. Blow air like you are blowing through a straw. When your mouth cavity is smaller air is much easier to control.

How to blow a speck call
The Speck call is built with a three-part insert. The reed assembly holder, the wedge block, and the toneboard. The wedge block is used to hold the reed in place along the toneboard, and can be used to alter the sound and air pressure needed, when moved in conjunction with the reed. The meticously designed toneboard is what allows the reed to fluctuate with the air to produce it’s realistic sound. Our reed assembly holder was built with a larger straight bore eliminating some of the backpressure, while creating a more dynamic range in volume. Since some of the backpressure has been eliminated, backpressure should be created with your hand at the exhaust end, without sacrificing range of volume. By placing your forefinger and thumb around the insert you can increase backpressure by cupping and closing your hand around the exhaust. Your off hand can be used as well to increase range of volume and variance in sound by placing your call hand in the palm of your off hand and forming a sound chamber.
 
Calling
Yodel - Put Short burst of air into the call while saying “OOOT-oot” (High-low). The first “ooot” is higher and louder than the second “ooot”. Vary your number from one single “ooot” to two to three, or maybe even 4 in a string changing speed and inflection.
 
How to tune your Single reed duck call?
When replacing the cork, make sure the reed is set all the way back against the cork slot. Slowly push the cork in place with a small screwdriver or similar object. Make sure the cork is all the way back into the cork slot. Trim the front of the reed. Always dog ear the front corners of the reed at a 60 degree angle. Remember, the longer the reed-the deeper the sound and the harder to blow. The shorter the reed-the higher pitch the sound and the easier to blow. Always use original RNT reed and cork replacement sets for your RNT calls.
 
How to tune your Speck call?
Every call that leaves our shop is properly tuned. Please note that we recommend only the advanced caller disassemble the call for re-tuning. However, if you feel the need to re-set the reed, please use the following instructions. We recommend before disassembling that you mark how the reed is set with a felt tip marker so that proper re-tuning can be achieved. The toneboard and wedge block should always fit tightly into the reed assembly holder with the reed falling into the tone trough. The reed must fall into the tone trough for the call to properly break over. Remember, the longer the reed the deeper the sound and the harder to blow. The shorter the reed- the higher pitch the sound and the easier to blow.
 
How to tune your Canada Goose call?
Every call that leaves our shop is properly tuned. Please note that we recommend only the advanced caller disassemble the call for re-tuning. However, if you feel the need to re-set the reed, please use the following instructions. We recommend before disassembling that you mark how the reed is set with a felt tip marker so that proper re-tuning can be achieved. The toneboard and wedge block should always fit tightly into the reed assembly holder with the reed falling into the tone trough. The reed must fall into the tone trough for the call to properly break over. Remember, the longer the reed the deeper the sound and the harder to blow. The shorter the reed- the higher pitch the sound and the easier to blow.


RNT Rich-N-Tone Duck Calls RNT Goose Calls RNT-V Quackhead Buck Wild